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20120901
20120930
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WHUT (Howard University Television) 69
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 69 (some duplicates have been removed)
. a little bird told me you were paid on the city of los angeles. initially you did not want to do it because you did not want to come to l.a. >> furs, i started acting very young, -- first, i started acting very young, so my ego was three affected by the business and whether or not i got parts, and you are only as good as your class project now, so when i came to los angeles, i used to call it the city of fear, because i was always auditioning and always waiting for the next thing. initially, i also did not want to come to the show, because it was so far away from home. it was a long way away, but i have learned to not just like the city but to love the city. after seven years of trenton -- renting, i bought a house after finishing, which is so outrageous, which is part and parcel of the way we do things. let's do this. it makes no sense, but let's do it anyway. tavis: i am glad you had a great experience. i would hate for you to hate every minute of it. >> i loved it. tavis: when you first started, did you think it was going to resonate with the audience? >> i do not think you can ever know
birdie told me that you were hating on our city of los angeles. >> oh, yeah. [laughter] tavis: that initially you really didn't want to do this because you hated l.a. so much, that you didn't want to come to l.a. from new york city. >> well, let me say two things about that. first of all, i started acting very young, so my ego was very much affected by, you know, this business and whether or not i got parts and you're sort of only as good as your project in a lot of ways. so when i would come out to los angeles, i used to call it the city of fear, honestly, because i was always auditioning and i was always waiting for that next thing and i was always hoping that the movie would do well or whatever. it felt like a one-business town, and in some ways, it is. tavis: some ways it is. >> in some ways it is. so initially i also didn't want to come out and do the show because it was so far away from home. i mean, it is a long way away. but i have learned to not just like the city, but love the city. in fact, after seven years of renting, i bought a house after we finished "the closer
? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. presented by kcet, los angeles.
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight a conversation with journalists hedrick smith. the book explores the economic and social amrallies that put the dream out of reach. and what we can learn from auto icon henry ford. that conversation coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: hedrick smith spent more than 25 years at the "the new york times" covering six presidents and callous world conflicts. he is an emmy-winning tv producer. his new text is called "who stole the american dream?" >> i am delighted to be here. >tavis: you argue that the american people are more concerned about the divide between the rich and poor, more concerned about th
do those things for themselves. >> police in los angeles are searching for two men who robbed a branch of bank of america on tuesday. they strapped a device to a hostage and forced her to take money out of the bank vault. >> played out in daylight on the streets of l.a. a bank robbery carried out by a bank manager, kidnap, and told she was wearing a bomb which would be detonated if she did not do what she was told. >> a device was strapped to her body and that she was ordered to take the money out of the bank which she did. there were other employees inside and she explained to them what was happening and it showed them the device that was strapped to her body. everyone believed this was an explosive device. >> the device was removed and a robot was brought in to make it safe. the police still have not said whether it was a bomb or a fake. the robbers made off with an undisclosed amount of money. there was a similar robbery in 2003 in pennsylvania when a pizza delivery man walked into a bank with a pipe bomb and it took thousands of dollars. it was never established whether or
a guitar when i was out for the war, and they knew i liked music, and he was with the los angeles philharmonic, and he was black and could not work anymore. he brought it over and put it on my stomach, and strummed it. feeling the vibrations, what is that? that was it. and the opportunity of boring up in los angeles, where the record industry was starting to get steam. a lot of musicians were coming year, so by the time i was a teenager, there were opportunities. you could make a buck. it turned out that you could support yourself. gas did not cost as much to get to a gig as it does now. blues, jazz, all of these things, so there again, luck was with me. tavis: a little bit of luck, but you have got a lot of talent. and who have you not played with over the years? the stones -- >> thank you, but talent is good if you have enough desire. a friend of mine says it is mostly desire. you want to do it. to push yourself. "i am going to learn the song or this thing on the guitar," and figure out how some guy in the mountains of appalachia or somebody plays this and then maybe to get a ch
range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. presented by kcet, los angeles.
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economy and the continuing conversation about austerity. this weekend in los angeles, dr. baraber be at the independence day, hoping to solve our shared problems. we are glad you could join us for our conversation with dr. benjamin barber, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: all right, please welcome david barber to the program, the noted author and furious at the center for the philanthropy and civil society at the university of new york. he is also the founder of interdependent state. it celebrates its 10th anniversary in l.a., and he joins us from new york. it is good to have you on the program. >> thank you, tavis. good to be here. tavis: the democrats in ch
flight to los angeles... where it will be put on display.the shuttle is scheduled to make several stops along the way... ppssing sites significant to nasa's shuttle program... including the mission control center in houston..endeavor is scheduled to be on display at the california science center by late october. 3 fans are going ágagaá.... over lady gaga's new scent. scent.the pop icon launched a new perfume called "fame." it's black in the bottle... but goes on to your skin clear. gaga says, like fame.... the scent smells goodd.. but isn't! as for how she áchoseá the smell? we'll let the pop star do the explaining... "i wanted it to smell slutty to be totally honest. i don't think women need to smell interesting. i have an interesting mind but i want to smeel like slut to be totally honest." honest."the new scent is being sold at macy's. 3 coming up... coming up... topllss photos of kate middleton... could soon be publ. published.where they were taken... and what the royal family is doing today... to keep them hidden.you're watching fox 45 morning news.. all local.. all mornin
. from los angeles, i am
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. low des raise. -- all look at the presidential race. gchris cillizza is out with a nw book, also iyanla vanzant. er latest project is goncalled "iyanla, fix my life." we are glad you joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. always the right time to do the right thing. by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: chris cillizza is the managing editor at the washington post. he is also the author of a new book. good to have you back from the program. good >> thank you for having me back. tavis: i have not had a chance to talk to you person to person since mr. romney has made his famous comment. let me start with a comment itself and what your read on it is. >> there were a number of stab things for him politically. it was a tape of him speaking to republican donors. he seemed to say an honest attempt to say there are a lot of people who are not go
pears." ♪ ♪ ♪ tavis: good to have you back on the program. i did not realize that you have lived in los angeles for 30 years. >> when i got lost trying to get to your studio, i should have known better. i drove a couple of different jobs. i drove for another company that was based near the studio. transporting checks at night. everybody has a job. that was my job. to make a living with a guitar for a lot longer. i drove all over l.a., that was my life for a number of years. i'm one point, i was born in kentucky, raised in ohio, but i grew up in california. i felt like i became an adult here. i landed here. i dropped out of ohio state. we did beat you in football. they stole that coach from ohio state. the futures would, over, and a decent -- the hoosiers would come over and a decent team went out the window. i came to the west coast in 1977. there was a great feeling of the remnants of the country rock scene and the eagles were at the apex of their career. linda ronstadt was also. i was drawn by those beacons. it became home. l.a. is infectious. tavis: why not nashville? >> i got there,
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight conversation with wyclef jean. he is out with a new book called "purpose: an immigrant's story." we are glad you joined us. a conversation which wyclef is coming up now. always the right time to do the right thing. by doing the right thing. to completely eliminating hungerwalmart committed $2 billion toas we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. please welcome wyclef jean. he is out with a new book. a good good to have you back. 5 i am good. how are you? >> last time i saw you you were rocking the stage at the aids concert. you killed that thing. >> we created a new two-step. >> that was quite a day. we enjoyed that. you started this book talking about the earthquake in haiti. it is interesting to me that you chose to start with that event. good why? >> it was bigger than anything i have ever done to go back to a place in 24 hours and the idea of thousands of people dead on the ground, the idea of kids screaming your voice and you know the
. predictable winners on the night of surprises. bbc news, los angeles. >> we will have more on the winners and losers later on. we will be asking if damian lewis was right when he talked about this being a golden age of television drama. all right, a reminder of our top story. a senior chinese police chief became the last person to be caught up in the scandal surrounding the murder of a british businessman late last year. he has been jailed for 15 years for trying to cover up the murder. that is all for the moment, but stay with us here on "bbc world news." we have plenty more to come.
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with noted law professor and longtime policy advocate peter edelman. a georgetown professor and former clinton administration official. out with a new text about poverty in america. his thoughts on what the growing divide between the haves and have-nots means and why the issue does not have the attention of leaders in washington. a conversation with peter edelman coming up right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: peter edelman is the founder and director of the center on poverty, inequality and public policy at georgetown and a former assistant secretary at the department of health and human services. he's also a noted author whose latest text is called "so rich, so poor: why it's so hard to end poverty in america," and i am honored to
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. knight, a conversation with oscar-winning filmmaker jonathan demme. he is out this month with a new project about neil young. in september, he is releasing another documentary, this colony -- this one about post a katrina new orleans. the film is based on a series with premier called "right to return." that conversation, coming up right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it is the cornerstone we all know. it is not just a street, but the place where an walmart stance with your community. -- stands with your community. >> and a contribution from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: always pleased to welcome jonathan demme to this program. the oscar-winning filmmaker has not one but two projects out soon, the first, a rare look at the life of rock icon, neil young. the new film is called "neil young journeys" and opens in theaters june 29. so here now a scene from "neil young journeys." ♪ ♪ >> that used to be the mill where i would catch fish when i was 5 years old, or whatever. this is a tow
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight a conversation with the founder and president of the huffington media group, arianna huffington. now the democrats have a tricky task of convincing people to reelect president obama despite economical problems. also we remember michael duncan, gone too soon at the age of 54. we are glad you joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> please welcome arianna huffington back to this program. she is the founder of huffington opposed media group. she is also behind chateau convention, a nonpartisan alternative to the major conventions, focusing on poverty, influence of money and politics, and the war on drugs. she joins us from charlotte. good to have you on the program. let me start by
severe of the storms. a hot day in los angeles. 30 degrees. this will persist into the weekend. 28 in seattle. will fall by 10 degrees into sunday. all right, let's head now into europe. toward the north. wet, windy. afraid. northern british isles. through scandinavia and russia. rest of the continent is looking dry, calm. temperatures on the rye. berlin, 19. sunday, rising to 25 degrees. seeing 27 in vienna. as well as 27 in london. and to give you an update on what is happening the last three days of paralympic games. forecast looks sunny. 25, 25, 27, to round off the games. i leave you now with your extended forecast. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> our top stories once again. u.s. president barack obama has accepted the democratic nomination at the party's national convention in charlotte, north carolina. he presented the election this november as a choice between two different paths for america. >> america, i never said this journey would be easy. and i won't promise that now. yes, our path is harder. but it lead to a better place. >> obama responded to voters' concerns about the economy
, is it, but that is what happened in los angeles when suspected bank robbers hurled money from their car while being pursued by police. >> the tv news helicopters tuned in for a high-speed car chase, but the reporters cannot believe what they were seeing. fistfuls of dollars into the street by suspected bank robbers. >> people out on the street, people hoping to collect money, a lot of people literally running up to the suspects. wow, look at that. >> it is harder to know if they were trying to get rid of evidence or to attract a crowd to block their pursuers. they were thought to a basket by jumping out of the vehicle, but eventually they ran into traffic. the crowds for perhaps hoping for a windfall. >> he is stuck in a pocket there. >> the men were caught, arrested, and taken away for questioning. >> that was the driver in the short time. >> there we are paid a reminder of our top stories. hundreds of protesters angered by an anti islam film stormed the u.s. compound in yemen. that is all for the moment. stay with us on "bbc world news." we have plenty more. >> make a sense of interna
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight the conversation with the former secretary of labor, robert reich. he talks about the two-party agenda and what they must do it if they win in november. he is out with a new book called "beyond how to arrange -- beyond outrage here " we are glad you joined us. >> there is a saying king had that said there is right thing. by doing the right thing. to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> robert reich is now a professor at uc-berkeley his latest book is called "beyond outrage." he joins us from berkeley pier reagan >> thank you for having me. >> on friday of this week we expect jobs numbers to come out. next wave we are waiting for official poverty numbers to be released. there is a link between poverty and joblessness, but what is your sense of what the nation ought to expect with jobs numbers and poverty numbers on to
. cooling down also in, in oklahoma city with a high 2u62. looking hot in los angeles. 31. should be warming up to 36 degrees, as well head into your friday. all right. finally, let's go over to europe. then it is mostly wet and windy out toward the northwest. remnants of tropical storms are moving into scotland as well as norway. that is going to produce very heavy rain as well as very strong winds. down towards the south, we have got upper cold, low, existing in the alpine region as well as the the northwestern balkan peninsula. thunderstorms, gusty wind and hail will continuetomorrow. all right, temperatures are as follows the. still on the hot side. lisbon. 33 degrees. very cool for this time of year in vienna. only 12 degrees. feeling more look late october here. that's the for now. here is your extended forecast. ♪ ♪ >>> that's all for now on this edition of "newsline." i'm yuko aotani in tokyo. thank you for watching.
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. a conversation with tony danza. he is out with a new book about his experiences as a 10th grade english teacher. in 2009, he began a stint as a teacher at philadelphia's largest public high school. we're glad you have joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: pleased to welcome tony danza back to this program. he embarked on a unique journey when he decided to teach 10th grade english in philadelphia. that experience served as the basis for a series. it also inspired a new book, "i'd like to apologize to every teacher i ever had." good to have you back on this program. what are you apologizing for? >> i apologize for not b
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with one of the most popular and prolific actors of our time, richard gere. his projects included pretty woman, an officer and gentleman, and chicago. a new movie called arbitraged, he is also a tireless human rights advocate. we glide your joining us for a conversation with richard gere. >> there is a saying that dr. king had, he said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome richard gere to this program, the tireless human-rights advocate. the story of a troubled hedge fund manager, here is a scene from arbitrage. >> everybody wins if we sell the company. if i live for you. >> you did not know about it, that is why did not
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with author and activist jamie lee curtis. her latest book is out this month and is called "my brave year of first." we're glad you joined us for a conversation with jamie lee curtis. >> there is a saying that dr. king had, he said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome jamie lee curtis back to this program, the award winning actor and best selling author is out with her latest, my brave year of first. i love that title. but that is not a buck. >> you know what? this is taunting me. this is actually a certifiable taunting. tavis: james taylor and tavis smiley. >> i'm surprised that you are not making out. i know why you're m
tavis: good evening. smiley. -- i am tavis smiley from los angeles. tonight, salman rushdie. his book is called "joseph anton," which was his book name. that is coming up. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome salman rushdie that to the program. there was a fatwa placed against him following his release of "the satanic verses." welcome back to the program. are you all right? let me start with a quote from this book. the book, i should mention, is written in third person. but this is from the book. to hide in this way is to be stripped of all self-respect. to be told to hide was a humiliation. maybe he thought to live like this would be worse than death. in his book
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight a conversation with penny marshall. she is out this month with a critical acclaim memoir called uts.other was no we are glad to have joined us. a conversation with penny marshall, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: i am pleased to welcome any martial back to this program. she has written a funny memoir about her life and career entitled "my mother was nouts." at herake up look back life in jail. >> it very, very good. -- about her life in film. >> there are no holes. thanks. ♪ >> are you crying? >> no. >> are you crying? are you crying? there is no crying. there is no crying in baseball. ♪ tavis: you look at one of th
city, houston, nearly at 30 in los angeles as well. okay, let's go to europe. finally. things still looking pretty welt, unstaewelt, unstable. band coming in. parts of scandinavia. denmark, affected by the front line coming in. we will see sig nif cannificant, central france. germany. very dry, unpleasant here. that will change over the weekend. that said, storms are moving away in the east. in towards the black sea. so, behind that you will see some clearing. in the eastern balkans. few showers moving through the moscow area at the moment today. 19 degrees here. 19 in kiev. we have 13. cooler in stockholm. 15 in london. still summer look temperatures to be found across the mediterranean. 28 in athens. 30 for you in lisbon. 27 in lisbon. 30 in madrid. here is your extended forecast. >>> that's all for now on this edition of newsline. i'm yuko aotani in tokyo. thank you very much for joining us.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 69 (some duplicates have been removed)